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Vets Advice (2005)

Page updated - 06 December 2005

Contact Details:

Simon Bailey. Ardmore Veterinary Group, 57 Cornard Road, Sudbury, Suffolk. CO10 2XB

Tel: (01787) 372588.     Visit the Ardmore Vets Website

Cornard News - This advice was previously published in Cornard News

2005 Spring

Issue 21

FEMALE DOGS

Q. My 14-year-old female dog seems to be passing blood in her urine occasionally, but otherwise is doing well and she does not seem to be in pain at all, what could be causing this and is it serious?

 

A. There are a number of reasons why your dog may be showing ‘haematuria’, usually referred to as passing blood in its urine.  The blood can be lost into the urine from any point from the kidneys, bladder, urethra and associated structures, as well as wounds in the adjacent skin.  Therefore the best option would be to get your dog checked by your vet and bring a fresh urine sample to the appointment as this can give invaluable clues to the underlying cause of blood loss.

Obtaining a urine sample can be difficult but the vet will only need a relatively small amount to test.  The easiest way is to use a clean tin foil takeaway container and wearing plastic gloves when the dog urinates quickly hold the container in the dogs urine flow.  The urine collected should then be placed in a clean container to bring to the consultation.

The most common cause for haematuria is cystitis (infection of the bladder) this can usually be treated simply by a course of antibiotics.   However there are many other possible causes ranging from infections, wounds, bladder/kidney stones, cancer of the bladder/uterus and even being in season if she has not been spayed. Your vet will discuss both the specific investigation and treatment of the condition in your dog as these can vary considerably according to the underlying cause.  However it is very important if blood is seen in their urine to get them checked as soon as you can, so appropriate treatment can be started rapidly.

If you require further information about these or any other veterinary related topic please contact me at Ardmore Veterinary Group, 57 Cornard Road, Sudbury or www.ardmorevets.co.uk

 

Simon Bailey

 

2005 Summer

Issue 22

RABBIT DISEASES

With the onset of the summer weather there are a few diseases in rabbits that can easily be avoided. The condition seen mostly is called ‘Blowfly Strike’ (or maggot infestation). Flies lay their eggs that develop into maggots and then eat away at the skin and flesh of the rabbit. This is painful and can be life threatening if severe enough.  Rabbits at the highest risk are those that suffer from obesity, dental disease, diarrhoea, skin wounds and poor hygiene, e.g. dirty hutches, as these factors will attract flies.  Effective prevention involves regular cleaning and checking of your rabbit and it’s environment, and the use of fly repellent or medications which prevent maggots developing if the eggs are laid.

 

A second common disease at its peak in the spring and early autumn is Myxomatosis, which is common in wild and domestic rabbits. The virus which causes the disease is spread by blood sucking insects, and if a rabbit is infected it’s chances of survival are relatively low. The good news is prevention is available by combining effective insect control with a vaccination given every six months by your vet.

 

If you require further information about these or any other veterinary related topic please contact me at Ardmore Veterinary Group, 57 Cornard Road, Sudbury or www.ardmorevets.co.uk

 

Simon Bailey

 

2005 Winter

Issue 24

FAT CATS?

Q. I think my cat is very overweight but what can I do to reduce it?

 

A.  Firstly, take your cat to your vet and have it weighed and checked over because there are numerous medical conditions and some medications, which can result in excessive weight gain. Tell the vet if the cat has recently become heavier or if it has always been so as this will have a bearing upon the vet’s examination.

 

Many factors can work to cause cats to get overly heavy.  As in humans there are some factors you cannot alter, such as the genetic tendency to be overweight, and factors, which can be altered such as the diet and exercise.  This is why overweight cats tend to be house cats that exercise little, and often eat excessively, perhaps out of boredom. It is not completely clear the detrimental effects of excessive weights in cats but there is a much higher incidence of diabetes and urinary disease, and as in humans it has been implicated in a higher incidence of cancer, arthritis, heart disease and a condition called hepatic lipidosis.  This is a severe form of liver disease. Once overweight the challenge is to promote weight loss safely using achievable targets.  However it must be performed cautiously as too rapid a weight loss can put cats at a much greater risk of severe liver disease, and also weight that is lost slowly as in humans is more likely to stay lost. Altering the diet to reduce the calorie intake is a great starting point, and your vet or a suitably trained vet nurse will be able to advise you on this matter and how to achieve a gradual decrease.  Ideally this is also combined with additional exercise, which can be something as simple as playing with your cat more often.  Remember everyone should run and play, even cats!

 

If you require further information about these or any other veterinary related topic please contact me at Ardmore Veterinary Group, 57 Cornard Road, Sudbury or www.ardmorevets.co.uk

 

Simon Bailey